Fuseworks Media

Tip Screen Stress: 28% have felt pressured into tipping – Survey

More than a quarter of Kiwis (28%) have felt pressured into leaving a tip when presented with a tip screen at payment time, finds a new report.

A survey of 1,020 New Zealand adults, conducted by the personal financial information website Banked, found that while 47% see tipping as a good thing, a significant number have felt uneasy about the appearance of a tip screen at a point of sale (POS).

The publication of the survey results follows the recent rollout of new EFTPOS machines that ask customers if they want to leave a tip of 5%, 10%, or 15%.

“While it feels like tipping is becoming more common in New Zealand, it isn’t the norm and it can be easy to feel caught off guard by a tip screen,” says Kevin McHugh, Head of Publishing at Banked.

“If you didn’t expect it or didn’t intend to leave a tip, it can be an awkward moment – especially if the restaurant, cafe, or bar staff are right there with you. For many people it can leave a sour taste in the mouth after what was hopefully a pleasant dining experience.”

At 39%, Gen Z Kiwis are the generation most likely to have felt pressured into tipping by a tip screen. Older generations are more resilient in these situations, with 26% of Millennials and 27% of Gen X saying they have felt pressured to tip. Just 21% of Baby Boomers say they have experienced that pressure.

Conversely, Banked’s survey found that younger people were more likely to feel positively about tipping in New Zealand. A majority of Gen Z (51%) and Millennials (56%) think that tipping is a good thing, compared to 39% of Gen X and just 13% of Baby Boomers.

Other survey findings include:

  • 60% of people either sometimes or often tip.
  • Of those who think tipping is a bad thing, 60% say it’s because servers should be paid enough already.
  • Younger people are much more likely to tip.

Learn more in Banked’s Tipping in New Zealand Survey 2024.

 

Powered by Fuseworks and Truescope - Media monitoring, insights and news distribution for New Zealand organisations.